Side Effects of Wisdom Tooth Extraction: Long Term and When to Heal

side effects of wisdom tooth extraction

Wisdom teeth, also known as third molars, are located at the back of the mouth,  side effects of wisdom tooth extraction are many when they don’t have enough room to grow.

They can become impacted, which means they are blocked by other teeth or bone and are unable to fully emerge, or they can grow in crooked or at an angle, which can cause crowding and damage to other teeth. Removal of these teeth is a common oral surgery procedure, and it’s done to prevent or alleviate these problems.

Side effects of wisdom tooth extraction:

The most common side effects  of wisdom tooth extraction are pain, swelling, bleeding, and bruising. These symptoms typically improve within a week after the procedure, but can last longer in some cases.

Other potential side effects include dry socket, which is an infection in the socket where the tooth was removed and can cause severe pain. Some people may also experience numbness or tingling in the tongue or lower lip, caused by injury to a nerve during the extraction.

This usually resolves within a few weeks. Other rare side effects may include infection, difficulty opening the mouth, or changes in taste.

Side effects of upper wisdom tooth extraction:

Upper wisdom tooth extraction, also known as maxillary third molar extraction, can cause a range of side effects, some of which are unique to this specific procedure.

The most common side effects of upper wisdom tooth extraction  are pain, swelling, bleeding, and bruising, which are typical of any tooth extraction.

However, with upper wisdom teeth, there is a higher risk of experiencing dry socket, a painful condition that occurs when the blood clot that forms in the socket after the tooth is removed, is dislodged or dissolves.

This can lead to exposure of the bone and nerves, causing severe pain and discomfort. Additionally, as upper wisdom teeth are located closer to the sinus cavity, there may be a risk of developing sinusitis, a condition characterized by inflammation of the sinus lining, which can lead to sinus pain or infection.

Some people may also experience numbness or tingling in the tongue or lower lip, caused by injury to a nerve during the extraction, which usually resolves within a few weeks.

Long term side effects of wisdom tooth extraction:

Long-term side effects of wisdom tooth extraction are generally not significant. However, in some cases, there can be some long-term effects such as:

  1. Changes in bite: The removal of wisdom teeth can cause changes in the bite, as the remaining teeth may shift to fill the gap created by the extraction. This can lead to malocclusion or misalignment of the teeth.
  2. Jaw pain or stiffness: In some cases, the jaw muscles and joint may become sore and stiff, leading to pain or discomfort.
  3. Loss of bone density: The extraction of wisdom teeth can lead to a decrease in bone density in the jaw, especially in cases where the wisdom teeth were impacted.
  4. Sinus Issues: If the upper wisdom tooth was close to the maxillary sinus, the extraction may cause a sinus opening which may lead to sinus pain or infection.
  5. Nerve damage: In rare cases, nerve damage may occur during the extraction, leading to numbness, tingling, or loss of sensation in the lower lip, tongue, or chin.
  6. Temporomandibular joint disorder: TMJ disorder can occur as a result of the extraction, leading to pain and discomfort in the jaw joint.

However, it’s important to note that these long-term effects are rare and most patients do not experience any significant long-term effects after wisdom tooth extraction.

Side effects of smoking after a wisdom teeth extraction:

Smoking after a wisdom tooth extraction can cause several side effects and can delay the healing process. Some of the side effects include:

  1. Delayed healing: Nicotine in cigarettes constricts blood vessels, which can slow down the healing process and increase the risk of infection.
  2. Dry socket: Smoking can cause dry socket, a painful condition that occurs when the blood clot that forms in the socket after the tooth is removed, is dislodged or dissolves.
  3. Increased risk of infection: Smoking can also increase the risk of infection at the extraction site.
  4. Bad taste and smell: Smoking can cause a bad taste and smell in the mouth, making it difficult to eat and drink.
  5. Numbness or tingling: Smoking can cause numbness or tingling in the tongue or lower lip, caused by injury to a nerve during the extraction.
  6. Swelling and Bruising: The extraction site and the surrounding areas may become swollen and bruised after the procedure more if smoking happens
  7. Longer healing time: The healing time is longer for smokers as nicotine constricts blood vessels and reduces the oxygen supply to the wound.

It is highly recommended to avoid smoking for at least 48 hours after the extraction and to follow the oral surgeon’s instructions for proper post-operative care to minimize the risk of complications

How long does wisdom teeth holes take to heal?

The healing process after wisdom tooth extraction can vary greatly among individuals and depend on several factors such as the location and complexity of the extraction, as well as the individual’s overall health. How long does wisdom teeth holes take to heal? To answer this question, first  we have to understand the healing process.

The process is generally divided into three stages: the initial healing phase, the inflammatory phase, and the remodeling phase.

The initial healing phase begins immediately after the extraction and usually lasts for about 24 to 72 hours. During this phase, a blood clot will form in the socket, which helps to stop the bleeding and begin the healing process.

The inflammatory phase, which usually lasts for about 3 to 5 days, is when the body’s immune system will start to clean up the area and remove any debris, this stage is crucial to avoid infections.

The final stage, the remodeling phase, can take several weeks or even months. During this phase, the body will begin to rebuild and strengthen the bone in the area where the tooth was removed. This stage is crucial to maintain the integrity of the jaw bone and prevent any future dental issues.

It’s important to remember that healing times can vary greatly among individuals, with some patients experiencing minimal pain and swelling, while others may have more significant discomfort.

Following the instructions of your oral surgeon for proper post-operative care, such as avoiding smoking and drinking from straws, as well as keeping the extraction site clean, can help minimize the risk of complications and promote healing.

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